Women alone are powerful. Together, they can have an impact. 

Women alone are powerful. Together, they can have an impact. 

In an interview with the New York Times, Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein’s defence lawyer, stated that she “would never put herself in that position”, when asked if she had personally experienced sexual assault.

We would expect to have progressed to a point where women understand the difference between a victim and a perpetrator. But if some women are the first ones to place the blame on the victim, how can they expect to be listened to by men? 

The reason why the #MeToo movement was so powerful is because of the union created by women, coming who came together calling out sexual abuse and gender inequalities. 

This kind of support has proven successful in different fields. Research from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) shows that women in a working environment benefit from an inner circle of female contacts.

At times, one can wonder why men often don’t have to find groups to succeed or are told to stop criticising one another. The answer is simple: they already have what women are fighting for. 

Indeed, female movements are not about oppressing different opinions, but about coming together for a better future.