Empty Supermarkets
Pandemic-fuelled panic buying has constantly been featured in the media over the past few months. Sadly, this culture of stockpiling has accumulated an excessive amount of food waste.

Pandemic-fuelled panic buying has constantly been featured in the media over the past few months. Desolate supermarket shelves have been ransacked by ravenous shoppers, stacking their trollies high in preparation of a premature apocalypse.

Sadly, this culture of stockpiling has accumulated an excessive amount of food waste, with images littering the internet of unopened loaves of bread residing in British bins. So, put down the ten tins of beans and think twice before binning that bread, this enlightening list has been compiled to combat the inordinate amount of food waste brits are bombarded with.  

  • If stale bread is stacking up in your bread bin, why not blitz it into breadcrumbs or freeze the whole loaf, ready to be dispensed into the toaster at a moment’s notice.
Bread
Photo: Louise Lyshøj/Unsplash
  • Those bananas that have been inhabiting your fruit dish for some time, so much so they could grow legs and waltz into your compost bin, will make a smashing banana loaf. A simple recipe, which can amalgamate any topping or filling your heart’s desires. From wonky walnuts to chunky chocolate chips or slathered with a generous spoonful of peanut butter, you can really set your wildest banana loaf fantasies free. 
Bananas
Photo: Ioana Cristiana/Unsplash
  • The neglected fruit draw in the fridge can harbour the odd mouldy blueberry at times. However, this abandonment must be halted. If your raspberries are looking a little ropey and your strawberries are somewhat sad, freeze them! When you fancy transporting your taste buds to a tranquil tropical island, pop your frozen fruit into a blender, add your favourite fruit juice and boom, close your eyes you could be in Hawaii.
Photo: Brenda Godinez/Unsplash
  • Potato peelings can pile up after prepping a roast dinner, often ending their existence in the bottom of a bin. However, the humble potato peel is worthy of great respect, and can be resurrected into a flavoursome crunchy crisp. Place the peels on a baking tray drizzle, with olive oil (garlic olive oil if youre feeling fancy) and bake for 1minutes at 180 degrees.
Potatoes
Photo: Eiliv-Sonas Aceron/Unsplash
  • The smell of fresh citrus peel can waft an irresistible aroma around your home. Once you have devoured the juicy orange, or succulent grapefruit, do not discard the fragrant remnants as they can be made into a multipurpose cleaner. Put your peel into a large sealable container and cover with white vinegar. Leave to infuse for 2-3 weeks, then mix equal parts water with the citrus vinegar and transfer to an old spray bottle. Voila an environmentally friendly spray leaving your home smelling like the Amalfi coast.
Citrus
Photo: Kaitlyn Chow/Unsplash
  • If you have abandoned your basil, or the rosemary needs resuscitatingpop them into an ice cube tray and fill with water. When a recipe requires herbs, tend to your frozen herb garden for assistance.
Herbs
Photo: Markus Spiske/Unsplash
  • We are all guilty of rejecting the broccoli and carrots in the vegetable draw, seeking out the takeaway menu for a cheeky browse instead. However, halt the chicken korma, put down the poppadum’s, those vegetables can be summoned into a sumptuous soup. For an indulgent savoury soup roast the vegetables in olive oil, pop some stale bread in too for a crunchy crouton topping.
Photo: Cayla1/Unsplash
  • The Dolmio days are long gone as the shelves have been stripped bare of the nations beloved pasta sauce. Wipe away those saucy sobs as you can embark on your own arrabbiata journey. Those soft tomatoes that have sailed past their best before date, can be transformed into an enticing pasta dish, satisfying those quarantine cravings.
Tomatoes
Photo: Marc Mueller/Unsplash
  • Finally, make a meticulous meal plan and stick to it! When venturing to the supermarket on your next essentials only shopping trip, spare a thought for what frequents your fridge and cupboards, before sweeping the shelves bare and adding to food waste.
Supermarkets
Photo: Martijn Baudoin/Unsplash
Anna Fox
BA Journalism

-